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Want to Work for Equation? We Are Recruiting!

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Children And Young People Project Worker

Ave 21 hours per week, to be worked flexibly. Term-time only

Fixed Term till 26/7/19, may be extended (subject to funding)

Salary Scale: Equation Salary Point 22, £20,253 pro rata

Due to the expansion of our services, Equation is looking for an enthusiastic project worker to work as part of our Children and Young People team. This is a fantastic role for someone who is passionate about domestic abuse prevention. You will be part of a team delivering Equation’s healthy relationships and domestic abuse awareness projects in schools. You will also be responsible for supporting the training and development of the CYP team and maintaining relationships with schools and facilitators, ensuring high-quality service delivery.

Applications deadline: 9.00am, 31/05/2018

Interviews: 14/6/2018

Children and Young People Project Worker Job Description

Children and Young People Project Worker Person Specification

To apply for the above post, please download the application form below and return to Equation’s HR Lead on admin@equation.org.uk

Equation’s Vision, Mission and Values

Application Form

Children And Young People Coordinator

22.5 – 30 hours per week, to be worked flexibly. Hours negotiable.

Fixed Term till June 2019, to provide maternity cover

Salary Scale: Equation SP6 – SO1, Pt 26-31 £22,937 – £27,123 pro rata

Equation needs an enthusiastic project coordinator to work for one year, covering maternity leave, as part of our Children and Young People team. This is a fantastic opportunity for someone who is passionate about domestic abuse prevention. You will be leading and developing Equation’s expanding healthy relationships and domestic abuse awareness project, working with targeted groups of young people in secondary schools. You will be responsible for establishing and maintaining relationships with schools and facilitators, ensuring high quality service delivery.

Applications deadline: 9.00am, 31/05/2018

Interviews: 14/6/2018

Children and Young People Coordinator Job Description

Children and Young People Coordinator Person Specification

To apply for the above post, please download the application form below and return to Equation’s HR Lead on admin@equation.org.uk

Equation’s Vision, Mission and Values

Application Form

 

Community Fundraising Administrator

14 hours per week (flexible, may include evenings or weekends, term-time only considered)

Fixed term contract: 6 months. Potential to extend based on successful fundraising.

Salary: Equation Scale Point 11 £15,207 Pro-Rata.

Equation is looking for a community fundraiser to join our busy and hardworking fundraising team. Working with the Head of Fundraising and Trusts Fundraiser you will be responsible for driving our community fundraising income.

The role will include:

  • Engaging with supporters through Equation’s existing routes
  • Identifying groups and associations that would want to support Equation’s work
  • Encouraging companies and individuals to participate in third party events to raise money for Equation
  • Engagement at community events
  • Recruiting and managing volunteers to organize events and attend talks and events on Equation’s behalf
  • Organising Equation’s annual events including identifying new opportunities
  • Working with the Equation team to identify opportunities for fundraising
  • General fundraising administration support including sending out mailers, event administration and database use

Experience required:

  • Knowledge of community fundraising, ideally within a working capacity. However, knowledge through volunteering would be considered
  • Excellent written, verbal and presentation skills
  • The ability to identify opportunities for fundraising
  • Ability to build strong relationships
  • Awareness of the impact of gender inequality and domestic abuse
  • Car driver and knowledge of Nottingham is essential

Since the role will include contact with young people, a DBS check will be required.

Applications deadline: 9.00am, 07/06/2018

Interviews: Date TBC

Community Fundraising Administrator: Job Description

Equation’s Vision, Mission and Values

Application Form

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How to Spot the Signs of a Friend in Trouble

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Good friends are everything. But sometimes our closest friends can be suffering in silence. If you spot any of these warning signs, your friend may be experiencing domestic abuse in their relationship. #HelpAFriend. Learn the signs.

Control

Does your friend’s partner call and text her all the time? Does it ever seem like they’re checking up on her?

Isolation

Have you noticed you get to see your friend less and less, and that she’s also seeing less of her other friends and family? Maybe she seems to make excuses about why she can’t meet up, or you get the sense that your  friend’s partner is taking over her life.

Manipulation

Does it ever seem like your friend won’t make a decision without checking with her partner first? Does she often seem worried about her partner’s reaction?

Pressure

Have you noticed that your friend is behaving out of character – e.g. dressing, acting, or speaking differently? Do you think she may ever feel pressured by her partner to look or behave in a certain way?

Jealousy

Does your friend change her behaviour to avoid accusations of cheating from her partner? Does it seem like her partner is often jealous for little reason?

Fear

Have you noticed your friend treading on eggshells to avoid rowing with her partner? Have you ever got the sense that your friend is a bit afraid of them?

If you are worried about your friend’s relationship, trust your instincts.

Call the 24-hour free local domestic abuse helpline and find out how you can help her.

0808 800 0340

If you can’t get through, use the answerphone. All messages will be answered.

The helpline is run by Women’s Aid Integrated Services. Find out more at wais.org.uk

Find out more about the #HelpAFriend Campaign at equation.org.uk/helpafriendcampaign

#HelpAFriend is kindly funded by Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership, Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, the Home Office and the People’s Postcode Trust

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Free Domestic Abuse Resources to #HelpAFriend

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As part of Equation’s #HelpAFriend campaign in March, we have two awareness resources available for you to order: a set of posters to help people spot the warning signs of a friend experiencing domestic abuse, and a handy guide to supporting a friend who is in an abusive relationship.

Warning Signs: Posters

This set of 6 bright and attention-grabbing posters shows what domestic abuse can look like to a friend from the outside. Each poster explains one of the less well-known “warning signs” (control, jealousy, manipulation, isolation, pressure, and fear).  The posters direct to the 24-hour helpline as the central point of support for local women survivors and their friends and family. Suitable for all community venues and places of work.

During March 2018, workers and residents in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire can each order a FREE set of Warning Signs posters

Warning Signs posters

How to Help A Friend: Booklet

These quick guides are designed for people with friends or family members experiencing domestic abuse. Concise and small (A6) in size, the handy booklets provide simple step-by-step information about how to help in a safe and supportive way. The booklets give guidance to friends and family about what to say and do, and also helpfully include a peel-out Domestic Violence and Abuse Information Card to give to a survivor of domestic abuse. The cards cover essential safety and support information for women in Nottingham or Nottinghamshire.

The general advice in the guide is also relevant for men and people of any gender.

These booklets are useful for anyone living locally wanting to know how to support someone close to them who is being hurt by a partner or ex.

During March 2018, workers and residents in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire can order up to 30 How to Help a Friend booklets for FREE (post and packaging costs may apply).

How to Order

Order your resources now using our online order form.

online order form

 

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Equation launches #HelpAFriend campaign

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This March, Equation is running a bold campaign in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire that could help people save their friends from the harm of domestic abuse. For the first time in the City, ordinary residents will be given tools to recognise if someone close to them is experiencing abuse, and to help their friends reach expert support.

Equation is running the #HelpAFriend project using an attention-grabbing social media and print campaign, and several promotional giveaway events. We hope the campaign will increase the number of women accessing the local 24-hour domestic and sexual violence helpline (0808 800 0340), which receives over 10,000 calls each year.

Chloe Cheeseman, Campaigns Coordinator, says: “Many people experiencing domestic abuse find it difficult to report what is happening to professional support agencies, which means a huge number of survivors are not receiving any help.

“Their friends and family, who are ordinary people like you and me, can make a huge difference. They are very well-placed to spot the warning signs of abuse, and to help friends or family access support that can keep them safe and well.”

Equation’s innovative campaign shows what abuse can look like to a friend from the outside. By promoting the simple steps involved in responding helpfully to friends or family who are being hurt by a partner, we hope to build the tools and confidence of everyone in the local community to be an upstander against domestic abuse.

If you are worried that your friend is being hurt by her partner, ring the 24-hour domestic and sexual violence helpline to find out how you can help: 0808 800 0340. The helpline is run by Women’s Aid Integrated Services; find out more at wais.org.uk

You can also find out more about how to support a friend or family member on our dedicated campaign webpage: equation.org.uk/help-someone

#HelpAFriend is kindly supported by Nottingham Crime and Drugs Partnership, Nottinghamshire Police and Crime Commissioner, the Home Office and the People’s Postcode Trust

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#PressforProgress: Iconic Women Who Shaped the World

From Nottingham to New Zealand, International Women’s Day is celebrated around the world every year on 8th March.

This joint push for gender equality is an important reminder that a society that equally respects women, men and all genders is crucial to ending domestic abuse. As we all unite to #PressforProgress (this year’s theme), we’re taking a moment to recognise just some of the women who’ve done the same over the years.

You can also find out how to celebrate International Women’s Day in style with us.

Mary Wollstonecraft (27th April 1759 – 10th September 1797)

An English writer and passionate advocate for women’s educational and societal rights, Mary Wollstonecraft defied social norms from a young age. She left the home of her abusive father to dedicate herself to writing, encouraged and supported her sister to leave her husband and, made plans to live in a mutually supportive environment with her friends (a ‘female-utopia’).

Her seminal work, A Vindication of the Rights of Women, argues that women are not naturally inferior to men and that women should have access to education. She is often cited as a huge influence in the feminist movement and as one of the founding feminist philosophers.

Mary Jackson (9th April 1921 – 11th February 2005), Katherine Johnson (26th August 1918 – present day), Dorothy Vaughn (20th September 1910 – 10th November 2008)

These incredible women have recently been immortalised in the record-breaking, Hollywood Blockbuster, Hidden Figures – finally getting some of the recognition they deserve.

Fighting sexism and racism, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Dorothy Vaughn, all African-American mathematicians, changed the world in more ways than one when the work they did as ‘human computers’ helped NASA to win the space-race.

Katherine Johnson finished university by the time she was just 18 years old. Her important work made it possible for Alan Sheppard and John Glenn to go to space.

Dorothy Vaughn finished university by the time she was 19 years old. After working as a human computer, she went on to work with the first electronic computers at NASA.

Mary Jackson completed two degrees, in Science and in Mathematics, and went on to work directly with flight test engineers.

Marsha P. Johnson (24th August 1945 – 6th July 1992)

The work – the unpaid labour – that African-American Marsha P. Johnson did in her lifetime to support people with AIDS, as well as young trans, gender non-conforming, and gay street children is beyond inspirational. She opened shelters with friends to provide safety and community, financing them through sex work.

She was constantly involved in activism for equality and specifically gay rights, including a pivotal role at the Stonewall uprising. This led to the first Pride march in New York city and is generally recognised as the beginning of the gay liberation movement in the United States.

Her importance in fighting for LGBTQIA+ rights has often been obscured in mainstream movements throughout the years, though her influence remains strong.

Funmilayo Ransome Kuti (25 October 1900 – 13 April 1978)

Heralded as ‘The Mother of Africa’, Funmilayo Ransome Kuti left a legacy to women in Nigeria to fight for their rights.

An activist, educator, and passionate political campaigner, she was one of the most prominent leaders of her generation and a forerunner of second wave feminism. She also co-founded the Abeokuta Women’s Union – a Nigerian organisation with more than 20,000 grassroots members all fighting for economic equality through price regulation and the abolition of separate taxes for women.

You!

If you’re a woman, take time to reflect and recognise your own personal achievements today – however you define them, on your own terms. If you’re a man, why not take some time today to help the women in your life #PressforProgress towards gender equality and end men’s violence against women? Whatever your gender, even seemingly small acts can change the world for those around us.

Thanks for taking the time to read this – and happy International Women’s Day for the 8th March!

Celebrate International Women’s Day with us!

Dedicate some time to you and your friends, with bubbles, a cream tea and live entertainment at our High Tea & Fizz event on 8th March 2018.

You’ll be helping to #PressforProgress by supporting us and our partner, Women’s Aid Integrated Services. Together we can end domestic abuse and achieve gender equality.

Find out more and book now.

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We’re Hiring – Freelance Facilitator

Equation Freelance Facilitator
Flexible working hours on a self-employed basis, predominantly during school hours and term times.

We are looking for individuals to join our freelance facilitator team. One of a number of such posts, this role’s primary duties are in delivering domestic abuse and healthy relationships awareness projects with children and young people in line with Equation’s business plans, values and priorities. 

The amount of schools work can vary throughout the academic year, however there would be an expectation that successful candidates could offer a reasonable amount of time per term to cover schools projects, especially during busy periods.  

Salary: £11.28 – £14.03 per hour
Applications deadline: 9.00am on 12/03/18
Interviews: 22/03/18 

How To Apply

Please download our application form to complete and return to admin@equation.org.uk

Application Form

Additional information can be found in the supporting documents linked below:

Information Pack

Our work with children and young people

Our Vision, Mission and Values

 

 

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#Vote100: Five Women We Should Celebrate

On February 6th 2018 we celebrate the 100th anniversary of Parliament passing the law allowing women to vote for the first time.  The organised campaign for women’s suffrage began in 1866 with a petition to Parliament. Then on 6th February 1918, about 8.4 million women gained the vote in the UK through the passing of the Representation of the People Act. This momentous occasion meant that women (albeit only those who met the minimum property requirements and were over the age of 30) were granted the right to vote.

At Equation, we know that achieving gender equality – a society in which men, women and all genders are equally respected and treated – is crucial to ending domestic abuse. So in celebration of the centenary, here are some pioneering female campaigners, lawmakers and politicians who we think have been fundamental to furthering women’s rights in Britain in the last 100 years:

Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett (11th June 1847- 5th August 1959) We probably wouldn’t be celebrating the centenary of women’s suffrage if it weren’t for Millicent Garrett Fawcett. A long-time activist, she began campaigning for the repeal of the Contagious Diseases Acts. These required prostitutes/sex workers to be checked for sexually transmitted diseases and punished if they were found to have any. The Act only set these harsh requirements on women, which Fawcett believed reflected huge sexist double standards. Her hard work paid off when the Act was repealed in 1886.

She led the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (NUWSS) from 1897-1919, which successfully lobbied Parliament for votes for women. The NUWSS campaigned throughout World War One for suffrage, highlighting the vital part women played in the war efforts. This ultimately led to women being ‘rewarded’ with the right to vote.

 

Barbara Castle, Baroness Castle of Blackburn (6th October 1910- 3rd May 2002) A true heroine of equality in the workplace, Barbara Castle was instrumental in passing the Equal Pay Act (1970) through Parliament. The historic law prevents the discrimination between women and men in terms of the pay and conditions of work. Castle first became involved due to the Ford machinists’ strike in 1968. The sewing machinists at the Dagenham Ford Plant went on strike and demanded equal pay. They lobbied Parliament and, as Secretary of State for Employment, Castle helped resolve the issue. This resulted in the machinists earning 92% of what their male colleagues were paid, instead of 85% before the strike.

 

Olive Morris (26 June 1952 – 12 July 1979) Probably the least well-known woman in this list, Olive Morris was a grassroots community leader from Brixton. Passionate and daring, she was a member of the Black Panther Movement, and helped set up the Brixton Black Women’s Group, the Organisation of Women of African and Asian Descent. During her student years in Manchester, she contributed to the formation of Black Women’s Mutual Aid and the Black Women’s Co-op.

Morris died young at just 27  years old. Her work and activism is poorly recorded, as is the case with so many grass-roots histories – especially those of women, people of colour, those disenfranchised and people living in poverty. However, she is one of many women who should be remembered for her contribution to improving the lives of ordinary women in Britain. Until her death, she worked tirelessly on anti-racist campaigns and mobilised the local communities in Brixton and Manchester to create a force for racial justice in the 1960s and 70s.

 

Marie Stopes (15th October 1880- 2nd October 1958) A pioneer in women’s sexual health, Marie Stopes published several pamphlets on sex and contraception and strove to make the topic of birth control less taboo in 1920s and 30s Britain. She opened the country’s first family planning clinic in 1921. The clinic offered free advice to married women, and by 1930 several other clinics around the country joined Stopes to form the National Birth Control Council, now known as the Family Planning Clinic.

 

Marai Larasi (July 1969- present) Ms. Larasi is a black and ethnic minority (BME) women’s campaigner who serves as Executive Director of Imkaan, which is the organisation dedicated to tackling violence against BME women. She also co-chairs the End Violence Against Women Coalition and has devoted her life to campaigning to end the violence and suffering of BME women and girls. She is closely involved with United Nations efforts to end violence against women. In recognition of her hard work, Larasi was recognised as one of the most influential LGBT individuals by the World Pride Power List in 2013.

As we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first women gaining suffrage, we should also take time to recognise the achievements by countless women activists since. Whether in the realm of politics, law, sexual health or prevention of violence against women, our list highlights just a fraction of the women out there who have achieved so much towards greater gender equality, and which we can be thankful for today.

Even now, 1 in 4 women experience domestic abuse in their lifetime. Let’s celebrate how far we have come in advancing women’s rights and protection from violence in the past 100 years, and remember that there is still much more to be done.

To find out more about Equation and our work against domestic violence and abuse, visit: equation.org.uk/about/

#Suffrage100 #Vote100 #StillMarching

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Join Equation to Celebrate International Women’s Day

Are you doing anything to mark International Women’s Day on the 8th March? Why not grab some of your best female friends and join Equation for a fun-filled evening celebrating women?

High Tea and Fizz to Celebrate International Women’s Day

Thursday 8th March 2018 | 5.00 – 7.30pm | £25.00 | St James Hotel, Nottingham

“We have a lot of work to do. But we can get there if we work together”  – Beyoncé

Enjoy a fun evening of fizz and high tea to celebrate the power of women to #PressforProgress on International Women’s Day 2018.

You’ll be treated to bubbles on arrival at the stylish boutique St James Hotel in Nottingham City Centre, followed by a delicious cream tea and live entertainment.

Enjoy this relaxed and informal event to support Equation and Women’s Aid Integrated Services, leading charities working to prevent and reduce the harm of domestic violence and abuse in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire.

To find out more and book, check out the fundraising event page.

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Domestic Abuse Risk Assessment Checklist (DASH RIC)

Are you using the most up-to-date DASH RIC form to risk assess survivors of domestic abuse?

The Domestic Abuse, Stalking and Harassment and ‘Honour’-based violence Risk Indicator Checklist (DASH RIC) form should be used by all non-police workers in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire who receive a disclosure of domestic abuse.

The form allows you to better assess risk and make an appropriate referral for support, including to the Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC).

In December 2017, a new version of the form was released along with an updated referral process and helpful how-to guides.

Check out Equations’s Best Practice Library for the latest documents.

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How Men Can Help to Make Women Safe

Men of Nottingham and Nottinghamshire! You can help to keep local women safe.

Nearly 90% of survivors of domestic and sexual violence are women. Locally, 30,000 will experience domestic abuse. 9 in 10 perpetrators of abuse against women are men.

Most men do not use violence against women, but all men can help to end it. Will you?

Take action to end male violence against women and girls.

  1. Stand up against abuse.

    Promote a commitment to never use, excuse or remain silent about violence against women. Join the 30,000 men who have already pledged against abuse at whiteribbon.org.uk and wear a white ribbon to show your support.

    Go to White Ribbon

  2. Support women who need help

    If you think a woman is being hurt by a partner or ex, do something. Call the 24-hour domestic and sexual violence helpline on 0808 800 0340 and find out how to help her safely (the helpline is run by Women’s Aid Integrated Services).

    Find out more

  3. Challenge other men.

    When men are disrespectful about women, speak out. Get used to saying “that’s not okay” when you hear sexist jokes from friends, family and colleagues. Misogyny supports abusive attitudes: let others know that you won’t tolerate it.

    Join the White Ribbon movement

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