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Nottingham City JSNA

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JSNAs are local assessments of current and future health and social care needs that could be met by the local authority, Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), or the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB). Following the ascent of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 local authorities and CCGs have an equal and explicit duty to prepare Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNA) and Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies (JHWS), through the Health and Wellbeing Board.

The aim of a JSNA is to improve the health and wellbeing of the local community and reduce inequalities for all ages. It is used to help to determine what actions local authorities, the NHS and other partners need to take to meet health and social care needs and to address the wider determinants that impact on health and wellbeing.

 Introduction 
Domestic violence (DV) is “any incident of threatening behaviour, violence or abuse (psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional) between adults who are or have been intimate partners or family members, regardless of gender or sexuality”. This includes issues of concern to Black and Minority Ethnic and Refugee (BMER) communities such as so called “honour based violence”, Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage. (Home Office, 2008)Domestic violence impacts on all women irrespective of class, ethnicity or sexuality, it also affects men, including in same sex relationships. Domestic violence is linked to child abuse, adult abuse and also affects animals.Violence against women and girls can have a devastating effect on individuals and the communities in which they live. It ruins lives, breaks apart families and has an impact across the generations.A strategic approach, mirroring the governments aims of managing domestic violence through prevention, provision and protection has been taken to reduce domestic violence in Nottingham, which includes;1. Preventing domestic abuse, including through early intervention. This is about changing attitudes and preventing violence

2. Ensuring provision of support services for survivors and children. This includes effective provision of services, advice and support; emergency and acute services; refuge and safe accommodation.

3. Protecting survivors through the criminal justice system and holding perpetrators to account.

Nottingham Local Area Agreement (LAA) 

The Nottingham Domestic Violence Local Area Agreement includes a target on domestic violence in the Young Nottingham theme. The priority outcome is to improve the safeguarding and outcomes for children and families with complex needs.

The National Indicator (NI) 32 to reduce repeat incidents of domestic violence at Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC). The baseline is based on the national average of a mature MARAC.

Base line 

08/09 

09/10 

2010/11 

31%

n/a

28%

24%

An important addition to the Domestic Violence JSNA chapter is the recently produced (2011) Domestic and Sexual Violence Strategic Needs Assessment. For the first time, it brings together the assessment of domestic violence and sexual violence – two complex areas that have substantial overlap. When making any future commissioning decisions please do not read this JSNA chapter on Domestic Violence in isolation. The Domestic and Sexual Violence Strategic Needs Assessment can be found here.

Key issues and gaps 
The British Crime Survey (BCS) indicates that domestic violence is chronically under reported, but research estimates that it:• Accounts for 16% of all violent crime (source: Crime in England & Wales 2004/05)• Has more repeat victims than any other crime (on average there have been 35 assaults before a victim calls the police)• One incident of domestic violence is reported to the police every minute• Costs the Country in excess of £23bn per year, of which £3bn falls to public services.

• Claims the lives of two women each week and 30 men per year

• Is the largest cause of morbidity worldwide in women aged 19-44, greater than war, cancer or motor vehicle accidents

• One in four women and one in six men will be a victim of domestic violence in their lifetime, with women at greater risk of repeat victimisation, serious injury and fear.

 

The high numbers of reported domestic violence in Nottingham is one of the highest in the UK which puts huge pressures on resources available. The unmet needs and service gaps have been outlined in detail in section 8 and the commissioning recommendations reflects these gaps.

Recommendations for consideration by commissioners 
Strategic multi agency commissioning, mainstreaming and capacity building of existing specialist domestic violence voluntary sector is required.Commissioning falls into 2 key areas, that which can be included in services as good practice (see below) and the commissioning of services themselves.Non financial commissioning of services and practice • All Agencies to develop and promote policy and procedures for work with survivors, children and perpetrators (including employee domestic violence policies)• Publicity of agency policy and procedures to all communities

• Publicity of domestic violence services to all communities

• All agencies and departments should have a domestic violence lead or champion

• Domestic violence awareness and skills training for all staff and management

• Data collection, evaluation and reporting across all agencies, including all equalities data

• Screening and risk assessment for survivors and for perpetrators who use agencies

• Increase reporting of domestic violence in ‘cold spots’ and develop flexible and creative ways to deal with repeats

• Early intervention with children and young people including appropriate identification and support of those children whose parents are drug and alcohol users

 

Services requiring commissioning include the whole specialist domestic violence voluntary sector and statutory domestic violence sector outlined in this document. Priority commissioning is also outlined previously in this document.

The Nottingham City Council ASH independent needs modelling indicates that 50 accommodation based units and 180 non accommodation based units for survivors of domestic abuse will be required.

To read the most report in full see below:

Nottingham City JSNA 2011

 

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Nottinghamshire County JSNA

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JSNAs are local assessments of current and future health and social care needs that could be met by the local authority, Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), or the NHS Commissioning Board (NHS CB). Following the ascent of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 local authorities and CCGs have an equal and explicit duty to prepare Joint Strategic Needs Assessments (JSNA) and Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies (JHWS), through the Health and Wellbeing Board.

The aim of a JSNA is to improve the health and wellbeing of the local community and reduce inequalities for all ages. It is used to help to determine what actions local authorities, the NHS and other partners need to take to meet health and social care needs and to address the wider determinants that impact on health and wellbeing.

 

 

Executive Summary

Introduction 

 Over 27,000 people experience domestic abuse in the previous 12months and more than 156,000 people do so across their lifetime (16-59 years)

 There have been 11 domestic homicides in Nottinghamshire between 2011 and 2013

 Approximately 75% of children living in households where domestic abuse occurs are exposed to actual incidents1. These children have an increased risk of developing acute and long term physical and emotional health problems2.

 Reporting of domestic abuse incidents to Nottinghamshire Police has increased from approximately 6,000 in 2009 to 10,000 in 2013

 Recording of domestic abuse crimes by Nottinghamshire Police has increased gradually from 2009 to 2013

Screen Shot 2014-04-27 at 22.48.29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendations for consideration by commissioners 

1. Commission sufficient numbers of Independent Domestic Violence Advocates (IDVAs) to at minimum meet the Co-ordinated Action Against Domestic Abuse (CAADA) recommended coverage of 4 IDVAs per 100,000 adult female population

2. Enhance the Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) process through improved engagement and information sharing between MARAC and GP practices

3. Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to commission Identification and Referral to Improve Safety (IRIS) in accordance with recommendation 16 in NICE Public Health Guidance (PH50 published February 2014)

4. Investigate the possible reasons why there is a lower rate of recording of domestic abuse (6.4 per 1000 population) by Nottinghamshire Police than other local authority areas and the regional(16.4 per 1000) and national (18.2 per 1000) average.

5. Workforce to implement training in line with NICE PH50 guidance level 1-4

6. Improve data collection and reporting of outcomes in relation to domestic abuse and abuse across Specialist Domestic Violence and Abuse Services

7. Extend midwifery reporting of domestic abuse to all three Acute Hospital Trusts

8. Implement the recommendations outlined in the Domestic Violence and Abuse review (2014) and NICE PH50 guidance

 

For the full JSNA report, see below:

Nottinghamshire County JSNA 2014

 

 

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Parent abuse course on 8th May: fantastic offer available!

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Places are available for Equation’s expert course Addressing Young People’s Abuse of Their Parents on Thursday 8th May 2014.

This one-day course explores the issue of young people’s abuse of their parents and is useful for professionals and practitioners who work with children, families and parents. The day will cover the impact of domestic violence on young people, the prevalence and dynamics of parent abuse, building strengths in the parent/child relationship. The afternoon will focus on practical skills for working with parents experiencing abuse from their children, exploring family systems work and identifying simple techniques to utilise with young people.

The standard fee for this full-day course is £90, including lunch. Equation is also pleased to be able to offer members a fantastic discount on this course: every full-price place booked (at members’ already-discounted price of £85) will receive a half-price place (£42.50).

Find out more details and instructions on how to book onto this course on our training page.

Equation regularly offers expert training on a range of topics relevant to understanding and responding to domestic abuse, some of which are free for professionals in Nottingham City and Nottinghamshire. You can find out more details on our training pages.

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Legal Aid criteria for domestic violence survivors to be widened

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The Ministry of Justice have reviewed the evidence criteria needed for women survivors of domestic violence to access Legal Aid through the Domestic Violence Gateway. They have concluded that the criteria need to be widened and have put in place regulations to do just this.

This is a good start to making Legal Aid available to more survivors of domestic violence and represents a huge success for Women’sAid’s joint lobbying effort with Rights of Women and Welsh Women’s Aid, although there is still much more work to be done.

A key aspect of the amended regulations is that a letter from the 24 Hour National Domestic Violence Helpline (run in partnership between Women’s Aid and Refuge) would be admissible as evidence for a woman being unable to access refuge accommodation (which is part of the current evidence criteria).

Another key aspect of the amended regulation is that a letter from a domestic violence support service where a woman has been referred there by a health professional will be admissible as evidence of domestic violence. The new regulations have gone live and will come into force on Tuesday 22 April 2014. You can read them here: http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/814/contents/made

Guidance should be available from the Ministry of Justice from 17 April 2014, and will be made available in our Library when this is published.

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HMIC report on police response to domestic abuse

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Published on Thursday 27 March 2014, a new HMIC report informs the public on how the police service is responding to domestic abuse.

Everyone’s business: Improving the police response to domestic abuse is now available in our relevant Library pages.

Summary
In September 2013, HMIC was commissioned by the Home Secretary to inspect the police response to domestic violence and abuse. The report, Everyone’s business: Improving the police response to domestic abuse found that, while most forces and police and crime commissioners have said that domestic abuse is a priority for their areas, this isn’t being translated into an operational reality. HMIC is concerned to find that, despite the progress made in this area over the last decade, not all police leaders are ensuring that domestic abuse is a priority in their forces – it is often a poor relation to other policing activity.

The HMIC also released a report for each Home Office funded police force in England and Wales; you can find the Nottinghamshire Police report in our Library.

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Equation to start Reel Equality Film Club

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Equation are pleased to announce a new campaigns project. Coming soon to Nottingham in 2014 Equation will establish a Reel Equality Film Club, dedicated to improving representation of women in film by promoting and celebrating films that give greater screen-time to women’s voices and stories.

At the very least, films selected must pass the Bechdel Test.http://bechdeltest.com/

As of 5/04/2014, Reel Equality Film Club has a planning committee of 5 *fantastic* people made of staff and volunteers. The first Reel Equality screening is scheduled to take place in summer 2014. Make sure to like us on Facebook for the latest news.

In the meantime, the Committee will be busy setting goals, deciding venues and collaboration possibilities galore and of course picking our brilliant *films*!

 

Please email reel.equality@gmail.com if you’d like to contribute your thoughts on any of the above – otherwise watch this space for further information!

The club will also aim to go further than the Test and promote diversity on screen more widely, including better representation of people of varying age, race, class, sexuality, ability and circumstance.

If you’d like to get involved in the planning committee for the club, we will be recruiting again later in 2014. Please see Equation’s opportunities page for more information.

Brought to you by Equation, a Nottingham-based charity striving to end domestic abuse and promote healthy, equal relationships.

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Equation is now accepting card payments!

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As of March 2014, Equation is very pleased to be able to accept payments by card for resources and training, using the secure Paypal system.

If you’d like to pay for any of our products or training by card, please let us know when you are ordering/booking.

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Exciting volunteer opportunities available!

FUNDRAISING VOLUNTEERS WANTED

Do you have a passion for women’s rights and gender issues, or for ending domestic abuse? Are you interested in marketing, fundraising, campaigns or communication? Then volunteer for Equation! Support our work on domestic abuse prevention and response and against sexism and gender stereotyping.

VOLUNTEERS WANTED FOR CREATIVE WOMEN’S RIGHTS PROJECT

Do you have a passion for gender equality and women’s rights? Are you a fan of the arts and mad about film? Then volunteer as part of Equation’s exciting new creative project, Reel Equality, to bring a Bechdel Test Film Club to Nottingham!

Find out more information and download an application pack on our vacancies page.

 

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Reel Equality Live Illustration Event

Tues 11th March 8.30pm *free entry*

An evening of interactive art/film-tastic fun/breaks and beats to promote equal media representation of women.

Come along for an alternative evening of interactive and creative entertainment!

Enjoy a beverage and a boogie in the stylish Broadway cafébar as swift-handed local illustrators create a series of fun/moving/explosive film posters that challenge sexism in visual media.

“You can’t be what you can’t see”

Through creating *live* a series of fun and entertaining film posters that represent women positively, we seek to challenge the idea that women and girls’ value lies in their youth, beauty and sexuality. This message is everywhere and it limits women’s aspirations and self-esteem. We seek to change the way women are represented in the media and recognize women’s ability to contribute to the world.

Stiff Kittens will be playing chilled-out beats, swinging grooves and a sprinkling of soundtrack tunes to entertain your ears while you watch the art unfold.

Illustrators include beers on the corner, • SMALLKID •, Adam Gray and more!

Join the Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1460324054188994/

Brought to you by Equation and the University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre www.nottingham.ac.uk/hrlc

Supporting Mind the Gender Gap: The Rights of Women Conference https://www.facebook.com/events/768997213126287/

22/03/2014 at the University of Nottingham

 

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Researchers appeal for help from survivors of domestic violence

Patients who have visited the Emergency Department at Nottingham’s Queen’s Medical Centre because of domestic violence are being asked to take part in new research at The University of Nottingham.

The QMC is one of the few hospitals in the UK to have a dedicated domestic violence specialist nurse working full-time in the Emergency Department (ED).

Now the Nottingham University Hospitals’ Charity is funding a project to assess patients’ experiences of the emergency department at QMC to see if there could be further improvements.

People who have experienced domestic abuse and received treatment in the Emergency Department at QMC and who would like to take part in the confidential and anonymous interviews for this research are asked to contact the research hotline on 07891 784 163 or email Dr McGarry on Julie.McGarry@nottingham.ac.uk.

There is on average one domestic violence-related murder per year in Nottingham and the British Crime Survey indicates that at least 10 per cent of women and two per cent of men are at risk from domestic violence every day. Around 7,000 children in the city are also living with the problem.¹

Lead researcher Dr Julie McGarry from the University’s School of Health Sciences said:

”Nottingham does not have a bigger problem with domestic violence than other similar cities but this sort of violence is often but not always a hidden problem. It is vital that we continue to improve support for survivors who attend the Emergency Department.”

“Previous research has already found that the specialist nurse is having a very positive impact among other Emergency Department staff at the QMC who have found her expertise invaluable when patients report domestic violence, or if they suspect it. Now we want to assess the impact of services more generally among the patients themselves so we would be very keen to interview survivors of abuse.”

Barbara Cathcart from the Nottingham Hospitals’ Charity added:

“Nottingham Hospitals Charity sponsors peer reviewed projects for every area of the hospitals it supports. We are pleased to support this domestic violence research because of its impact across every part of society.

“To extend this important service and to continue to support the work for which Nottingham is known nationally, the Charity also funds a nurse specialist whose remit is to educate nurses throughout the hospital trust about identifying signs of potential abuse, with the aim to support those patients at risk. It is envisaged that this latest research in the emergency department will enhance the level of support provided in this area throughout the Trust”.

¹Nottingham City Council Joint Strategic Needs Assessment data.

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